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About this Video

Sam Rodriques has seen the future, and he’s here to describe it. Apparently, we’ll all have tiny holes in our skulls to allow probes to study the circuitry of our neural systems. This and other surprising visions arise from Sam’s dissatisfiaction with the limitations of current neuroscience: studying mice might be good enough for diabetes, but it doesn’t work for studying complex human brains. The innovations we need may be strange and even frightening at times, but they may be the key to understanding and treating disease in the brain. Sam Rodriques was trained as a theoretical physicist, and now works at the Media Lab building new tools to map the activity and spatial organization of neurons in the brain, with the goal of understanding how the brain changes over development and during disease.


About the Speaker

Sam Rodriques

Sam Rodriques

Sam Rodriques was trained as a theoretical physicist, and now works at the Media Lab building new tools to map the activity and spatial organization of neurons in the brain, with the goal of understanding how the brain changes over development and during disease.