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About this Video

Cities around the world are impacted by water availability, water quality, protection of property, and protection of public health and safety due to shifts in the frequency and intensity of rainfall events, increasing economic development, and urbanization. With greater uncertainty around the future, communities face a growing need for resilient and coordinated stormwater storage systems such as ponds and lakes to better manage these critical issues. What techniques can be used to enable existing and build new flood storage systems such that they prepare and act well in advance of rainfall and flooding events? In this talk, learn how these adaptive techniques are being used across the United States, delivering direct outcomes for communities and positively impacting people’s ability to thrive in healthy, productive communities. Marcus Quigley is the CEO and Founder of OptiRTC, a technology company focused on delivering a cloud-based platform for Continuous Monitoring and Adaptive Control (CMAC) of distributed stormwater infrastructure.


About the Speaker

Marcus Quigley

Marcus Quigley

Marcus Quigley is the CEO and Founder of OptiRTC, a technology company focused on delivering a cloud-based platform for Continuous Monitoring and Adaptive Control (CMAC) of distributed stormwater infrastructure.

Mr. Quigley has more than 20 years of experience in solving complex engineering problems as well as leading and managing major projects and running organizations. As a national technical leader, he has extensive experience in passive and active stormwater and green infrastructure design and construction, research and development, modeling, data analysis, integration of information technologies, and environmental field data acquisition. Mr. Quigley has co-authored numerous national guidance manuals for monitoring of stormwater runoff and evaluating and designing stormwater best management practices.

Mr. Quigley holds an MS in Civil Engineering from Oregon State University and a BS in Environmental Engineering from Notre Dame.