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On a snowy night in 2002 an 18 month-old girl died from a preventable infection that kills 30,000 people each year, as many as die of breast or prostate cancer. Rejecting the conventional wisdom of the era, Dr. Peter Pronovost and researchers at John’s Hopkins set out to transform a foundational idea of medical practice. In reducing that infection rate by 80%, Dr. Pronovost and his colleagues discovered the “secret sauce” for achieving profound change in otherwise inflexible professional cultures. He shares the secret here for applying it to situations beyond medicine.

Peter Pronovost is a world-renowned patient safety champion and a practicing critical care physician. His scientific work leveraging checklists to reduce catheter-related bloodstream infections has saved thousands of lives and earned him high-profile accolades, including being named one of the 100 most influential people in the world by Time Magazine and receiving a coveted MacArthur Foundation “genius grant” in 2008. Elected to the Institute of Medicine in 2011, Dr. Pronovost is an advisor to the World Health Organizations’ World Alliance for Patient Safety and regularly addresses the U.S. Congress on patient safety issues. He is Senior Vice President of Patient Safety and Quality, and the Director of the Armstrong Institute for Patient Safety and Quality at Johns Hopkins Medicine.


About the Speaker

Peter Pronovost

Peter Pronovost

Peter Pronovost is a world-renowned patient safety champion and a practicing critical care physician. His scientific work leveraging checklists to reduce catheter-related bloodstream infections has saved thousands of lives and earned him high-profile accolades, including being named one of the 100 most influential people in the world by Time Magazine and receiving a coveted MacArthur Foundation “genius grant” in 2008. Elected to the Institute of Medicine in 2011, Dr. Pronovost is an advisor to the World Health Organizations’ World Alliance for Patient Safety and regularly addresses the U.S. Congress on patient safety issues. He is Senior Vice President of Patient Safety and Quality, and the Director of the Armstrong Institute for Patient Safety and Quality at Johns Hopkins Medicine.